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OK (spelling variations include okay, O.K., and ok) is an English word (originally American English) denoting approval, acceptance, agreement, assent, acknowledgment, or a sign of indifference. OK is frequently used as a loanword in other languages. It has been described as the most frequently spoken or written word on the planet.[1] The origins of the word are disputed.

As an adjective, OK principally means "adequate" or "acceptable" as a contrast to "bad" ("The boss approved this, so it is OK to send out"); it can also mean "mediocre" when used in contrast with "good" ("The french fries were great, but the burger was just OK"). It fulfills a similar role as an adverb ("Wow, you did OK for your first time skiing!"). As an interjection, it can denote compliance ("OK, I will do that"), or agreement ("OK, that is fine"). It can mean "assent" when it is used as a noun ("the boss gave her the OK to the purchase") or, more colloquially, as a verb ("the boss OKed the purchase"). OK, as an adjective, can express acknowledgement without approval.[2] As a versatile discourse marker or back-channeling item, it can also be used with appropriate intonation to show doubt or to seek confirmation ("OK?", "Is that OK?").[3]

OK (spelling variations include okay, O.K., and ok) is an English word (originally American English) denoting approval, acceptance, agreement, assent, acknowledgment, or a sign of indifference. OK is frequently used as a loanword in other languages. It has been described as the most frequently spoken or written word on the planet.[1] The origins of the word are disputed.

As an adjective, OK principally means "adequate" or "acceptable" as a contrast to "bad" ("The boss approved this, so it is OK to send out"); it can also mean "mediocre" when used in contrast with "good" ("The french fries were great, but the burger was just OK"). It fulfills a similar role as an adverb ("Wow, you did OK for your first time skiing!"). As an interjection, it can denote compliance ("OK, I will do that"), or agreement ("OK, that is fine"). It can mean "assent" when it is used as a noun ("the boss gave her the OK to the purchase") or, more colloquially, as a verb ("the boss OKed the purchase"). OK, as an adjective, can express acknowledgement without approval.[2] As a versatile discourse marker or back-channeling item, it can also be used with appropriate intonation to show doubt or to seek confirmation ("OK?", "Is that OK?").[3]



  • In most cases, no. DJ's do not need any permission or licenses to play songs legally, since the club/restaurant/bar where the gig takes place are responsible for it. Also- if playing at a private event, such as a wedding, licenses are not required at all.In most cases, no. DJ's do not need any permission or licenses to play songs legally, since the club/restaurant/bar where the gig takes place are responsible for it. Also- if playing at a private event, such as a wedding, licenses are not required at all.In most cases, no. DJ's do not need any permission or licenses to play songs legally, since the club/restaurant/bar where the gig takes place are responsible for it. Also- if playing at a private event, such as a wedding, licenses are not required at all.In most cases, no. DJ's do not need any permission or licenses to play songs legally, since the club/restaurant/bar where the gig takes place are responsible for it. Also- if playing at a private event, such as a wedding, licenses are not required at all.In most cases, no. DJ's do not need any permission or licenses to play songs legally, since the club/restaurant/bar where the gig takes place are responsible for it. Also- if playing at a private event, such as a wedding, licenses are not required at all.

    Student
    Rupesh Acharya

  • Bananas are both a fruit and not a fruit. While the banana plant is colloquially called a banana tree, it's actually an herb distantly related to ginger, since the plant has a succulent tree stem, instead of a wood one. The yellow thing you peel and eat is, in fact, a fruit because it contains the seeds of the plant.Bananas are both a fruit and not a fruit. While the banana plant is colloquially called a banana tree, it's actually an herb distantly related to ginger, since the plant has a succulent tree stem, instead of a wood one. The yellow thing you peel and eat is, in fact, a fruit because it contains the seeds of the plant.Bananas are both a fruit and not a fruit. While the banana plant is colloquially called a banana tree, it's actually an herb distantly related to ginger, since the plant has a succulent tree stem, instead of a wood one. The yellow thing you peel and eat is, in fact, a fruit because it contains the seeds of the plant.Bananas are both a fruit and not a fruit. While the banana plant is colloquially called a banana tree, it's actually an herb distantly related to ginger, since the plant has a succulent tree stem, instead of a wood one. The yellow thing you peel and eat is, in fact, a fruit because it contains the seeds of the plant.

    Developer
    Roopesh